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West of Scotland Dry Stone Walling Association

AGM Minutes 2016

How to Join

Our members come from a broad spectrum of age and profession, and is equally popular with females and males. They come to us for a variety of reasons; in the first instance, perhaps a gardening project, perhaps, even fulfilling a longstanding curiosity to do some dry stone walling. We have even had family members turning up on a course as a gift from a son or daughter ! People from all walks of life have successfully learned to build in dry stone.

 

If you would like to join the West of Scotland Dry Stone Walling Association please complete the application form on the link below :-

 

 

 

 

What sort of fitness is required ? It would be wrong to say there is no physical effort involved in bending and stretching and lifting stones into position. However there is an unwritten code within walling that no one lifts a stone that is beyond his or her capability; they always ask for help. This means a total absence of the "macho element" sometimes found in physical pursuit. It also means that individual effort becomes more collective in the completion of a project. In other words everyone helps one other, indeed it has been often remarked that our branch is a very friendly and open group to join and work with.

 

 

There are no special props or equipment needed. Simply turn up in a pair of stout boots, preferably with protective toe caps, a pair of gardening gloves and clothing commensurate with our Scottish weather and you are ready to go. The basic tool kit consists of a walling hammer and one or two chisels.

 

 

There is a craftsman scheme in which individuals can pass up a ladder of qualifications through a testing process and gain a certificated level of expertise. However, others simply prefer to enjoy the outdoor activity and become proficient wallers without entering such a scheme. If one looks at the old days, when no formal qualification structure was in place, there were very fine wallers who confirmed the old adage that practice makes perfect.

 

 

Dry stone walls are a natural habitat for flora, fauna and wildlife and have been a part of our historical heritage for more that 200 years. Properly built and maintained a dry stone wall will last this length of time, so if you would like to touch a bit of history and involve yourself in the heritage of the country you are welcome to come on one of our courses and join us, if the bug bites.

WSDSWA Membership Form